How does dense wavelength division multiplexing work?

 

How does dense wavelength division multiplexing work?

  • Dense wavelength division multiplexing is a technology for fiber-optic networks that combines and transmits multiple signals at different wavelengths of light on the same fiber cable.

  • Fiber cable transmits data via pulses of light over thin strands of glass or plastic cable. Since photons at different wavelengths in a pulse of light do not interact with one another much, data from different sources can be combined or multiplexed onto a single fiber and sent to another point where they are separated.

Dense wavelength division multiplexing has been a mainstay in fiber-optic networking for more than 20 years. But how does dense wavelength division multiplexing work in practice, and what kind of advantages does it offer the enterprise? Here’s a short tutorial on “How does dense wavelength division multiplexing work?” that provides some answers.

How does dense wavelength division multiplexing work?

Dense wavelength division multiplexing is a technology for combining multiple data channels on a single fiber-optic cable. Fiber-optic cables are comprised of thin strands of glass or plastic over which data is transmitted as pulses of light. These pulses transmit light at up to 80 different wavelengths, and dense wavelength division multiplexing enables each wavelength to be encoded with data from a different source. Data is transmitted over the fiber to an endpoint, where the channels are separated. Consequently, a single strand of fiber-optic cable can carry signals from as many as 80 data sources.

How does dense wavelength division multiplexing work to improve bandwidth?

With dense wavelength division multiplexing, each channel can carry up to 2.5 Gbps of data. With 80 channels, a single optical fiber can carry 200 billion bits per second. A typical fiber-optic cable may have dozens or hundreds of fiber strands, enabling fiber-optic networks to achieve bandwidth of multiple terabits of data per second.

How does dense wavelength division multiplexing work to reduce costs?

Dense wavelength division multiplexing enables organizations to increase bandwidth without the cost of a dedicated network.

How does dense wavelength division multiplexing work with different protocols?

Dense wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM) is protocol-independent. DWDM-based networks can transmit data in Ethernet, IP, ATM and SONET/SDD, with bit rates between 100 Mbps and 2.5 Gbps.

How does dense wavelength division multiplexing work versus CWDM?

Course wavelength division multiplexing (CWDM) works similarly to DWDM but contains fewer channels and is used for shorter runs — usually for distances up to 60 kilometers.

How does dense wavelength division multiplexing work when scaling network resources?

With vast amounts of bandwidth available in a fiber-optic cable, dense wavelength division multiplexing enables organizations to scale networks quickly and easily.

How does dense wavelength division multiplexing work with Spectrum Enterprise?

Spectrum Enterprise, a leader in fiber solutions for business, provides network services that include dense wavelength division multiplexing technology to deliver high-bandwidth solutions for data-intensive voice and video transfer. Spectrum Enterprise Wavelength services enable data-intensive transport for data replication, hybrid WANs, data center transfers and critical large Web applications. With Wavelengths, organizations get scalable, high-performance bandwidth and can save on costs by converging network services.